Walt's blog

Cites & Insights 6:12 available

Cites & Insights 6:12, October 2006, is now available for downloading.

The 26-page issue (PDF as usual, but you can download HTML separates), which seems to have mostly long essays with long titles, includes:

Cites & Insights 6:11 available

Cites & Insights: Crawford at Large 6:11 (September 2006) is now available for downloading.

The 22-page issue (PDF as usual, but most essays are also available as HTML separates from the home page) includes:

Cites & Insights 6:10 available

Cites & Insights 6:10, August 2006 is now available for downloading--from citesandinsights.info, not cites.boisestate.edu.

The 30-page issue consists almost entirely of one big essay:

* Perspective: Looking at Liblogs: The Great Middle - a look at 213 library-person weblogs.

There's also one little piece:

* Bibs & Blather - three brief items.

Cites & Insights 6:10 postponed

The special "design and typography" issue of Cites & Insights for August 2006 has been cancelled on account of heat (and other reasons). (If you want more details, check Walt at Random after 5:30 p.m. PST today.)

My expectation had been that most people could and would skip this mini-issue. Now you (we!) all will.

Cites & Insights has moved

Cites & Insights: Crawford at Large has moved to

http://citesandinsights.info

or, if you want to save a little typing,

http://cical.info

All issues and essays are now available at the new site (which is a LISHost.org site, as you might guess).

Cites & Insights 6:9 (July 2006) available

Cites & Insights 6:9, July 2006 is now available.

This 26-page issue (PDF as always, but most essays are also available as HTML pages from the home page) is predominantly one 18-page essay:

  • Perspective: Finding a Balance: Libraries and Librarians - A mostly-upbeat continuation of the "Library 2.0" conversation.

The issue also includes:

Cites & Insights 6:8 available

Cites & Insights 6:8, June 2006, is now available for downloading.

The 26-page issue (PDF as usual, but most essays are available as HTML pages from the C&I home page) includes:

OCLC-RLG merger

Some of you presumably know that I've worked at RLG what seems like forever (not quite 27 years).

Blake's posted the OCLC and RLG press release about the two combining. Blake posted the whole thing: I just didn't click the "read more" button.

At this point, all I have to say about this is contained in this post at Walt at Random.

Cites & Insights 6:7 available

Cites & Insights 6:7, May 2006 is now available.

The 22-page issue (PDF as always, but each section is available as an HTML separate from the home page) includes:

No, I haven't shut down Walt at Random

Fixed--it was a Bloglines problem--but Technorati still says I'm hossam4000talat. I imagine that will clear itself up sometime soon.

If you subscribe to Walt at Random via an aggregator, you might or might not notice that it's disappeared.

You also might or might not notice your new friend, hossam4000talat, which at the moment seems to have one brand-new entry, a "hello world." entry.

Hump day

If you have even the slightest sense of humor about the wonders of the internet, go read this. Of course it's a joke. (I miss Lore's old site...)

Time to hang it up?

After much frustration and thought, I just posted this overlong rant at Walt at Random.

Since it's possible that one of my two readers here isn't also a W.a.r. reader, I thought I'd note it here because, well, I'm dead serious about this.

Right at the moment, despite the sun actually emerging for a while today, and maybe because I have a nagging headache, I'm discouraged. Maybe even fed up. And wondering whether it's worth it if what I do is so easily misinterpreted (or is it being misinterpreted?).

Cites & Insights 6:6 available

No rain today in Mountain View, for the first time in two or three weeks--what better reason to publish a Spring issue?

Cites & Insights 6:6, Spring 2006 is ready for downloading.

The 26-page issue (all essays except the last also available as HTML separates at the C&I home page) includes:

Reminding myself of this year's only resolution

For reasons that are best not enumerated, I was on the verge of massively violating the only New Year's Resolution I've made in years.

If you don't wish to go there, here's the start:

Don't attack the person, attack the message (if I must attack at all).

That's the easy part. The hard part:

When someone demeans me, uses slanderous labels, writes in a generally abusive or belittling manner in order to avoid actual discussion--don't respond in kind.

Cites & Insights update

I managed to "downgrade" to Acrobat 7.0 and, with a couple of tweaks, do a new "proper" PDF for this issue. It's still bigger than it should be (590K, but that's better than 622K--I think it should be around 400K), but the first page now seems to show up after five or ten seconds, not 20 or 30 seconds.

Cites & Insights 6:5 - temporary revision

It's the seventyfifth day of 2006, and C&I 6:5 is the seventyfifth issue of Cites & Insights. The special Diamond Anniversary edition is now available for downloading.

The 28-page issue, PDF as always (but also available as one big HTML file) consists of a tiny little Bibs & Blather and a 28-page

Perspectives: Seventyfive Facets--75 brief essays (average 290 words each), mostly new, some old (but most of you haven't seen them), covering a range of topics.

Programmers, analysts, and vendors want to be paid!

I appreciate the fact that Blake approved this story for posting. (I submitted a comment on Archivegrid.org to LITA-L, and it seems to have dropped into the bit bucket...)

Losing my cool (as if I ever had any)

I sent Blake some email today. In some ways I wish I hadn't. It was a brief note on why I haven't really commented on his "10 blogs" story (other than starting a kerfuffle over whether it's plausible to make distinctions about types of online writing).

Those who know me well enough know exactly what the problem was. Those who don't, well, don't need to know. It has to do with interpersonal relations and personal attacks.

Cites & Insights 6:4 available

Cites & Insights 6:4 (March 2006) is now available for downloading.

The 24-page issue is PDF as usual; you can also reach the first five essays as HTML separates from the home page.

This issue includes:

One that won't be in the next C&I

I'm a ways from doing the March Cites & Insights, but I just finished (I hope) writing the first draft of what's likely to be the longest chunk of the issue, a "Library Stuff" set that cites and comments on several separate articles as well as some of the articles in the tenth anniversary issues of D-Lib Magazine and Ariadne.

(Yes, the "four cancellations" post at Walt at Random was procrastination: the first article in Ariadne requiring comment was a 13,000-word landmark by Lorcan Dempsey, and I had to work up to writing about it...)

There was one more article that I'd printed out and that survived an initial winnowing: "Crying wolf: An examination and reconsideration of the perception of crisis in LIS education," by Andrew Dillon and April Norris, which appeared in the Fall 2005 Journal of Education for Library and Information Science. As the title suggests, Dillon (dean at U. Texas Austin's School of Information) and Norris (a master's student in that school) take issue with the cries of Michael Gorman and others regarding a crisis in today's library/information science schools.

I've just reread the article. I'm not going to add it to the "Library Stuff" section (which is 5,900 words already).

Not because it's not well done: It's very well done.

Not because I'm automatically in agreement with Gorman: By now, after "blog people" and several other issues, it should be clear that having coauthored a book with Michael Gorman 11 years ago does not mean I agree with him on any given issue today.

Nope. What finally dissuaded me was the sense that I just don't know enough to comment intelligently on either side of this issue. Not that that always stops me, but this time it did.

I haven't been to library school. I'm increasingly unlikely to do so. If I did, it would probably be a "library school"--the one at San Jose State University, which still does include the L-word and is, I believe, well respected for educating would-be librarians. And, frankly, I don't read so much of the formal refereed library literature that I have a strong opinion as to its strengths and weaknesses.

Thanks to blogs, I'm aware of a lot more newly-graduated and not-yet-graduated library school/information school students than I was, say, a decade ago. Among that group, I don't see some blind allegiance to technology at the expense of library values and the traditional aspects of librarianship--at least not very often. I see a lot of thoughtful and interesting people.

I think Dillon and Norris do a pretty good job of undermining some claims of crisis. So maybe this is a sub-citation: Not quite part of C&I, but a mild comment on what seems to be a good article, from one who's really not in a position to make coherent judgments in the area.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Walt's blog