Bibliofuture's blog

It's Time: The Wristwatch Makes A Comeback

With clocks being built into almost every digital gadget and machine, wristwatch sales have seen a decline in the past few years. But market analysts say the centuries-old time-telling tool is trying to make a comeback.

Wristwatch sales are actually on the rise this year, according to June Rhee, the fashion watch buyer for the Macy's department store chain.

"The overall watch business and the watch industry have been experiencing an unusual growth this year ... it's explosive, and people who've been in the industry for 20, 30 years have never seen numbers like this," Rhee says.

Rhee says the watch has become the "it" accessory of the year.

Full piece on NPR

Postcards from Penguin: One Hundred Book Covers in One Box

Postcards from Penguin: One Hundred Book Covers in One Box

This is a collection of 100 postcards, each featuring a different and iconic Penguin book jacket. From classics to crime, here are over seventy years of quintessentially British design in one box. In 1935 Allen Lane stood on a platform at Exeter railway station, looking for a good book for the journey to London. His disappointment at the poor range of paperbacks on offer led him to found Penguin Books. The quality paperback had arrived. Declaring that 'good design is no more expensive than bad', Lane was adamant that his Penguin paperbacks should cost no more than a packet of cigarettes, but that they should always look distinctive. Ever since then, from their original - now world-famous - look featuring three bold horizontal stripes, through many different stylish, inventive and iconic cover designs, Penguin's paperback jackets have been a constantly evolving part of Britain's culture. And whether they're for classics, crime, reference or prize-winning novels, they still follow Allen Lane's original design mantra. Sometimes, you definitely should judge a book by its cover.

Painting based on Hemingway's "Torrents of Spring"

Painting based on Hemingway's "Torrents of Spring"
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=280585917719

Painting depicts the train station in Petosky, Michigan
from Hemingway's book "The Torrents of Spring"

Petosky is the birthplace of Claude Shannon

I know you can't wait to get one

Signed limited edition of Decision Points by George W. Bush

Guess how much? Click here to find out: Decision Points (Limited Edition)

Why offshore ebook customers are so often frustrated

Publishing consultant Mike Shatzkin

In the past several months, readers of this blog from around the world have commented on the unavailability of ebook titles in their territories even though publishers would have the right to sell them. As near as we can tell, this problem often tracks back to big publishers that have gone to agency pricing. (That’s where the publisher sets the price to the end consumer and becomes the seller-of-record rather than the retailer intermediary being the seller.) It would appear that many (if not all) agency publishers have withheld their titles in territories outside the United States, even if they would have the rights to sell in those territories.

Full blog post

You may not give a sh*t

Amazon Has a Reported Deal to Buy Parent of Diapers.com

Amazon.com plans to announce Monday that it will acquire Quidsi, the e-commerce company that runs Diapers.com, for about $540 million, (Man! Half a billion for this.) according to a person with knowledge of the deal.

The acquisition suggests how far Amazon will go to maintain its edge in many corners of e-commerce, including sales of bulky household items for which it competes against Walmart.com and online drugstores.

In addition to Diapers.com, which sells baby supplies, Quidsi, based in Jersey City, recently started Soap.com, which sells drugstore products, and BeautyBar.com, which sells makeup and skin and hair products.

Full article in the NYT

Can Hard Case Crime solve the mystery of digital era publishing?

This small imprint might have all the ingredients necessary for survival – a distinctive look, a smart logo and a clear direction

Full article

An Anonymous, Offline, Peer To Peer File-Sharing Network In Public Space"

An artist in New York is installing USB drives in random locations across the city.

Full story: http://n.pr/cQkgeg

Lawrence Lessig: Re-examining the remix

Michael Sandel: The lost art of democratic debate

Violate patron privacy

Basically a bumper sticker that says that "I violate patron privacy."

Stephen King in the WSJ discussing ebooks

Article in the WSJ where they ask him some questions about ebooks.

WSJ: Do we get the same reading experience with e-books?
What about people who love physical books?
Is the future of publishing all digital?
Any drawbacks?
How much time do you spend reading digitally?
What's going to happen to bookstores?
Would you consider publishing one of your big books yourself online?

King: Click on the link to the article to find out.

Getting into the library

Notice in this video you have to scan your library card to get into the library. Just interesting to note the differences between libraries. Especially when you compare country to country.

Librarian shocked over events that led to resignation

A former Hooper librarian, who resigned over a disagreement regarding her efforts to help immigrants learn English, said she was shocked by what occurred when she went to remove her personal belongings from the library.

A city official and the police chief disagree with her view of the situation.
Karla Shafer worked part time at the small-town library for almost six years. During her tenure, Shafer obtained more than $30,000 in grants for the library. More than $15,800 of that money went to automate the library while another $4,200 was used for an area for teens. She also obtained two $5,000 grants from the American Library Association for the "American Dream starts @ your library" project offered with funds from The Dollar General Literacy Foundation.

http://fremonttribune.com/news/local/article_65d476a0-e2a9-11df-b50d-001cc4c03286.html

Mobile Travel Guides Can Help, but Trust Books

As with so many smartphone apps, it is tempting to look at the current spate of mobile travel guides and proclaim the end of their paper counterparts as we know them.

But to borrow a phrase often delivered to impatient travelers, we’re not there yet.

The better mobile travel guides, like Fodor’s iPhone City Guides ($6, for various locales), Lonely Planet’s Compass Guides ($5 on Android devices, for 24 cities) and Condé Nast’s Traveller series ($6, for Apple devices, covering four destinations), may be great for generating ideas and, at times, finding attractions or restaurants while out and about, but they are still harder to use than a book.

Full article

Data Scrapers

Data Scrapers are third-party organizations that use automated software to copy public data about people and products off of websites, sometimes to sell the information to advertisers. Wall Street Journal Technology Editor Julia Angwin says that this wholesale data capturing may change the way we see privacy on the internet.

Star Trek Cited by Texas Supreme Court

The following news almost makes up for how often I hide my head in shame of the decisions of the Texas courts. Especially when it comes to issues of science in schools, personal freedoms, and separation of church and state.

In the case of Robinson v. Crown Cork and Seal, the Texas Supreme Court has cited Mr. Spock. No, not Dr. Spock, the alleged parenting expert, but Mr. Spock, the Vulcan. Quoting from the opinion delivered on October 22, 2010, Justice Don R. Willett states:?

Read More http://www.wired.com/geekdad/2010/10/star-trek-cited-by-texas-supreme-court/#ixzz13hKKNLtE

The Phone Book

While there have been billions of copies printed, the phone book largely remains a neglected cultural artifact. Ammon Shea, author of The Phone Book: The Curious History of the Book That Everyone Uses But No One Reads talks about the often overlooked cultural impact of the phone book.

Working Needlepoint QRcode Facebook Link

See picture on Flickr of a Needlepoint QRcode Facebook Link - http://www.flickr.com/photos/tikaro/4438484758/in/pool-1080612@N20/

Variation on the sexy librarian trope

Making Ignorance Chic

Op-ed in the NYT by Maureen Dowd

Casanova’s rule for seduction was to tell a beautiful woman she was intelligent and an intelligent woman she was beautiful.

The false choice between intellectualism and sexuality in women has persisted through the ages. There was no more poignant victim of it than Marilyn Monroe.

She was smart enough to become the most famous Dumb Blonde in history. Photographers loved to get her to pose in tight shorts, a silk robe or a swimsuit with a come-hither look and a weighty book — a history of Goya or James Joyce’s “Ulysses” or Heinrich Heine’s poems. A high-brow bunny picture, a variation on the sexy librarian trope. Men who were nervous about her erotic intensity could feel superior by making fun of her intellectually.

Full op-ed

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