Bibliofuture's blog

Think You Know 'How To Write A Sentence'?

NPR discusses a new book by Stanley Fish called How to Write a Sentence: And How to Read One

NPR piece is here: Think You Know 'How To Write A Sentence'?

Scalia

A law professor I know sent me this email. I believe this prof has a slightly left of center political view just to give a little context on the sender.

-----------------------------

Agree or not, you all might enjoy reading the following three paragraphs, the first three paragraphs of a concurring opinion by Scalia, published yesterday.

Professor X

Cite as: 562 U. S. ____ (2011) SCALIA, J., concurring in judgment

SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES
No. 09–530
NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION, ET AL., PETITIONERS v. ROBERT M. NELSON ET AL.
ON WRIT OF CERTIORARI TO THE UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE NINTH CIRCUIT
[January 19, 2011]
JUSTICE SCALIA, with whom JUSTICE THOMAS joins, concurring in the judgment. -- Read More

Sex on the Moon

Book -- Sex on the Moon: The Amazing Story Behind the Most Audacious Heist in History

Thad Roberts, a fellow in a prestigious NASA program had an idea—a romantic, albeit crazy, idea. He wanted to give his girlfriend the moon. Literally.

Thad convinced his girlfriend and another female accomplice, both NASA interns, to break into an impregnable laboratory at NASA’s headquarters—past security checkpoints, an electronically locked door with cipher security codes, and camera-lined hallways—and help him steal the most precious objects in the world: the moon rocks.

But what does one do with an item so valuable that it’s illegal even to own? And was Thad Roberts—undeniably gifted, picked for one of the most competitive scientific posts imaginable, a possible astronaut—really what he seemed?

Mezrich has pored over thousands of pages of court records, FBI transcripts, and NASA documents and has interviewed most of the participants in the crime to reconstruct this Ocean’s Eleven–style heist, a madcap story of genius, love, and duplicity that reads like a Hollywood thrill ride.

Article in the LA Times from 2004 about the events that were the basis for the book.

1.3 million

1.3 million people bought the $20 gift certificate at Amazon.com for $10 at Living Social.

Teaching Wikipedia as a mirrored technology

Digital spaces on the World Wide Web can be consumed as windowed technologies, providing apparently transparent access to information, or as mirrors, multi–layered and complex, requiring critical reflexivity for productive participation. Approaching Wikipedia as a mirrored technology exploits its potential as a pedagogical tool with which students can improve their research practices and writing proficiency in digital environments. Students can learn to grapple with Wikipedia as a complex, living discourse community, whose rhetorical practices and technical conventions they must learn in order to make contributions to it that are accepted by fellow editors of the site and withstand its unique editorial processes. By writing for Wikipedia, students become critical users of this digital resource, develop rhetorical and technological proficiency, and generate texts that prompt real–world response and provide potentially useful information for fellow users of this massive digital resource.

Full article

$20 Amazon gift certificate for $10

Website "Living Social" has a deal today where you can get an Amazon $20 gift certificate for $10.

See: https://livingsocial.com/deals/21336?ref=personalized-link-box-4278462&rpi=4278462

USA Today had a piece about this deal: http://content.usatoday.com/communities/technologylive/post/2011/01/livingsocial-offering-da...

Huffington post has this article: Living Social Amazon Deal Explodes In Hours, Slows Website
See: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/01/19/living-social-amazon_n_811077.html

Update: There is an article in the NYT Bits Blog that indicates that "Living Social" may be taking a loss on this deal. See: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/01/19/livingsocial-gets-attention-for-amazon-discount/?re...

Multitasking

Hip youth are good at multitasking.

HBO: Netflix must charge more to use our content

Don't hold your breath for the arrival of "The Sopranos" or "Entourage" on Netflix's streaming service.
Citing a "high-placed Time Warner executive," The Hollywood Reporter reported late last week that the only way for Time Warner-owned HBO to offer its content on Netflix's service is if the rental company charges customers $20 per month, rather than the $7.99 it currently charges streaming-only users. At such a price, The Hollywood Reporter's source claims, Netflix would get a "meaningful amount of HBO content."

Read more: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13506_3-20028722-17.html#ixzz1BVHBJzXA

The Parking Lot Movie

Over the course of three years, filmmaker Meghan Eckman tracked the comings and goings of a solitary parking lot in Charlottesville, Va., chronicling the lives of the attendants who were working there. This inspiring documentary is the result. Hanging tough as they navigate the range of human emotion -- from hope to frustration, from a sense of limitless possibilities to stagnation -- the film's subjects embody the pursuit of the American Dream.

Trailer: http://www.imdb.com/video/screenplay/vi2196243993/

Clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N0R65Cagx98

And another: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8r8yxpEzmU&feature=relmfu

If you have Netflix you can see this movie in the "Watch it Instantly" section.

One good line in the movie roughly goes - What is the existential reality of your job? Here is a clip that has that language - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZBH3JkWZaU&feature=relmfu (First attendant talking in this clip is a librarian)

Link to DVD on Amazon: http://amzn.to/fkGHzx

Librarian featured in movie: http://libmma.org/portal/john-lindaman/

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is listed as one of the best books of 2010 in several places.

Here is an article discussing the book: Why Not Take All of Me? Reflections on The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks and the Status of Participants in Research Using Human Specimens

The Books That Changed Your Life

From the archives of "This American Life" -- Listen to full show

Stories of people who believe a book changed their life. It's a romantic notion, and one reason we believe it is because we want to believe our lives can be changed by something so simple as an idea — or a set of ideas contained in a book.

PROLOGUE.
When Alexa was seven, she started going through her grandfather's books. Her grandfather was a playwright and teacher, and through the books—and especially through his notes in the margins—she entered the world of 1930's American theater. And she found a book that changed her life: writer Moss Hart's autobiography Act One. (5 minutes)

ACT ONE. ACT ONE.
More of Alexa Junge and how Moss Hart's autobiography changed her life. She followed his path, learned specific lessons, and had a vision of him that was absolutely clear—until she met his widow. (10 minutes)

ACT TWO. THE FAMILY THAT READS TOGETHER.
The story of a book that changed a family's life, but only temporarily and not for the better. David Sedaris describes what happens when he finds a dirty book in the woods and shares it with his sisters. This story is published in Sedaris' book Naked. (9 minutes)

ACT THREE. ROGER AND ME, LEWIS AND CLARK.
Reporter Jeremy Goldstein tells the story of a man who had many books change his life, even though he'd never read them. (14 minutes) Available: The Journals of Lewis and Clark, containing excerpts from the explorers' journals. -- Read More

iPad vs. NookColor: eReading Death Match, by Nico Vreeland

Excerpt: Obviously the iPad does a lot more than reading, but this post is designed to give avid readers an idea of whether a Nook will be enough for them, or an iPad will be worth the extra money. And the short answer is: the Nook will be enough. It’s a close fight, but the iPad simply doesn’t seem...

Full story

Physics of the Impossible

Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration into the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation, and Time Travel is $1.99 as a Kindle ebook today.

Teleportation, time machines, force fields, and interstellar space ships—the stuff of science fiction or potentially attainable future technologies? Inspired by the fantastic worlds of Star Trek, Star Wars, and Back to the Future, renowned theoretical physicist and bestselling author Michio Kaku takes an informed, serious, and often surprising look at what our current understanding of the universe's physical laws may permit in the near and distant future.Entertaining, informative, and imaginative, Physics of the Impossible probes the very limits of human ingenuity and scientific possibility.

The author is Michio Kaku. The Wikipedia entry for the author is here.

N7M9ZX

The Power of Positive Deviance: How Unlikely Innovators Solve the World's Toughest Problems

The Power of Positive Deviance: How Unlikely Innovators Solve the World's Toughest Problems is on sale for 1 day for $2.99 on Amazon.

Book is published by Harvard Business Press

Book description:

Think of the toughest problems in your organization or community. What if they'd already been solved and you didn't even know it?

In The Power of Positive Deviance, the authors present a counterintuitive new approach to problem-solving. Their advice? Leverage positive deviants--the few individuals in a group who find unique ways to look at, and overcome, seemingly insoluble difficulties. By seeing solutions where others don't, positive deviants spread and sustain needed change.

With vivid, firsthand stories of how positive deviance has alleviated some of the world's toughest problems (malnutrition in Vietnam, staph infections in hospitals), the authors illuminate its core practices, including:

· Mobilizing communities to discover "invisible" solutions in their midst

· Using innovative designs to "act" your way into a new way of thinking instead of thinking your way into a new way of acting

· Confounding the organizational "immune response" seeking to sustain the status quo

$2.99 Kindle books on Amazon

Each day Amazon is making several Kindle books $2.99. The next day the books are set back to their regular price.

Some of the books for today are:

1) A Fistful of Rice: My Unexpected Quest to End Poverty Through Profitability
2) Always On : Language in an Online and Mobile World
3) The Book of Awakening: Having the Life You Want by Being Present to the Life You Have
4) Everything Is Illuminated: A Novel
5) Exploring Space 1999: An Episode Guide and Complete History of the Mid-1970s Science Fiction Television Series
6) Gothic Kings of Britain: The Lives of 31 Medieval Rulers, 1016-1399
7) Handmade Hellos:Fresh Greeting Card Projects from First-Rate Crafters
8) Honeybee Democracy
9) Mr. Darcy's Obsession
10) Sunday Soup
11) The Blue Sweater: Bridging the Gap Between Rich and Poor in an Interconnected World
12) The Last Thing I Remember
13) The Monster Hunter in Modern Popular Culture
14) The Wishing Box -- Read More

Sounds

Book:The Sounds of Star Wars

The Library at Pooh Corner

The story goes back 35 years. In the 1980s, I had a gruesome copy-editing job at E. P. Dutton, the American publishers of the “Winnie-the-Pooh” books. One of my colleagues was a crusty septuagenarian named Elliot Graham, whose title was director of publicity emeritus. Elliot was the shepherd of the original Pooh stuffed animals — Pooh, Tigger, Kanga, Piglet and Eeyore — which were kept in a glass case in the Dutton lobby on 2 Park Avenue.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/22/opinion/22boylan.html

Astronomer Sues University, Claiming Faith Cost Him a Job

In 2007, C. Martin Gaskell, an astronomer at the University of Nebraska, was a leading candidate for a job running an observatory at the University of Kentucky. But then somebody did what one does nowadays: an Internet search.

That search turned up evidence of Dr. Gaskell’s evangelical Christian faith.

The University of Kentucky hired someone else. And Dr. Gaskell sued the institution.

Whether his faith cost him the job and whether certain religious beliefs may legally render people unfit for certain jobs are among the questions raised by the case, Gaskell v. University of Kentucky.

Full article in the NYT

Big Brotheresque App Kills Your Automotive Anonymity

A new app that lets frustrated drivers vent their anger at boneheaded motorists already has branded your bumper with a “How’s My Driving” sticker, and it could raise your insurance premium. It’s like having thousands of unmarked police cars and speed cameras on every roadway, and it could spell the end of anonymity behind the wheel.

DriveMeCrazy, developed by Shazam co-founder Philip Inghelbrecht, is a voice-activated app that encourages drivers to report bad behavior by reciting the offender’s license plate into a smartphone. The poor sap gets “flagged” and receives a virtual “ticket,” which may not sound like much until you realize all the information — along with date, time and location of the “offense” — is sent to the DMV and insurance companies.

Full article at Wired.com

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