Bibliofuture's blog

Colorado Publishers and Libraries Collaborate on Ebook Lending Model

Libraries would own ebooks and offer purchase through catalog.
http://www.libraryjournal.com/lj/home/889765-264/colorado_publishers_and_libraries_collabora...

James Gleick’s History of Information

Review in the NYT Sunday Review of Books

Book on Amazon: The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood

Book trailer

If You Knew Then What I Know Now from Sarabande Books on Vimeo.

This book trailer got a good write up at Publisher's Weekly.

Richard Curtis 1999

Richard Curtis, veteran literary agent and president of Ereads.com, shared a few publishing predictions for 2011.

Here is a talk by Curtis in 1999 called Content Spoken Here

Intellectual Property’s Great Fallacy

Abstract:
Intellectual property law has long been justified on the belief that external incentives are necessary to get people to produce artistic works and technological innovations that are easily copied. This Essay argues that this foundational premise of the economic theory of intellectual property is wrong. Using recent advances in behavioral economics, psychology, and business-management studies, it is now possible to show that there are natural and intrinsic motivations that will cause technology and the arts to flourish even in the absence of externally supplied rewards, such as copyrights and patents.

Download full PDF here

Data Seen Overwhelming Cell Networks

As the popularity of smartphones continues to grow, the challenge, on a global scale, may only get greater.

Full article

Google Digitizes Back Issues of 'Spy' Magazine

The defunct satirical publication that launched a thousand magazine careers and dodged a thousand lawsuits is now available digitally — thanks to Google.

One minute piece on NPR

Searchable archive of Spy Magazine on Google

Trespass: A History Of Uncommissioned Urban Art

Trespass: A History Of Uncommissioned Urban Art

Graffiti and unsanctioned art—from local origins to global phenomenon

In recent years street art has grown bolder, more ornate, more sophisticated and—in many cases—more acceptable. Yet unsanctioned public art remains the problem child of cultural expression, the last outlaw of visual disciplines. It has also become a global phenomenon of the 21st century.
Made in collaboration with featured artists, Trespass examines the rise and global reach of graffiti and urban art, tracing key figures, events and movements of self-expression in the city's social space, and the history of urban reclamation, protest, and illicit performance. The first book to present the full historical sweep, global reach and technical developments of the street art movement, Trespass features key works by 150 artists, and connects four generations of visionary outlaws including Jean Tinguely, Spencer Tunick, Keith Haring, Os Gemeos, Jenny Holzer, Barry McGee, Gordon Matta-Clark, Shepard Fairey, Blu, Billboard Liberation Front, Guerrilla Girls and Banksy, among others. It also includes dozens of previously unpublished photographs of long-lost works and legendary, ephemeral urban artworks.

The Wristwatch Looks For a New Use

As people stop telling the time using their wristwatches and use their mobile phones instead, a new genre of device takes up the vacant real estate on their wrists.

Article mentions the wrist watch being used as a "third screen" to present information.

Full article

$467 Book

$467 book that made it into the Amazon top 100 books.

Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking

Media theorist Douglas Rushkoff has second thoughts about our digital practices

The kids I celebrated in my early books as “digital natives,” capable of seeing through all efforts of big media and marketing, have actually proven less able to discern the integrity of the sources they read and the intentions of the programs they use than we struggling adults are. If they don’t know what the programs they’re using are even for, they don’t stand a chance at using them effectively. They’re less likely to become power users than the used. It is our job as educators to change all this. We’re our students’ best chance of becoming media—or new media—literate. Yet our digital practices betray our own unconscious approach toward these media. We employ technologies in our lives and our curriculums by force of habit or fear of being left behind.

I regularly visit one-to-one laptop schools where neither the students nor the educators have any real sense of purpose about the highly technologized program they’ve implemented. They bring a very powerful new medium into the classroom and make it central without having reckoned with the medium’s biases.

Full article at School Library Journal

Citing Sources in the Age of the Internet and eBooks

Interesting blog post at "An American Editor" blog.

It has been an ongoing frustration of mine, dealing with bibliographic information that cites the Internet and ebooks.

In the olden days, way back when I was a student, the rule was that citing a source meant it really existed and was verifiable; one couldn’t cite and have accepted “James, J. (2010, August 10). Private conversation.” But today, I guess, anything goes — at least if you are in the role of author but not in the role of paper grader; that is, I find these types of cites in academic papers knowing full well that if a student of the author submitted such a cite, it would be unacceptable.

More important, however, is that cites to web pages that no longer exist — if they ever really existed — seem to be de rigueur, and no one complains. It used to be that it was not enough to cite a source, but the source had to be reputable and accepted in the field. It was pretty hard to cite Portnoy’s Complaint as an authority on sexual mores, yet I suspect that would not be true today.

Full blog post:
http://americaneditor.wordpress.com/2011/02/14/citing-sources-in-the-age-of-the-internet-and...

Thinking about the limits of customer service

Article at Library Journal
http://www.libraryjournal.com/lj/home/889183-264/selling_the_library__peer.html.csp

Excerpt:

I was just at a small informal gathering of academic library directors who were discussing a variety of things, including who was doing what about discovery layers, whether we need to revisit shared collection development, and what was going on at our libraries in the areas of information literacy and faculty development. In the course of our discussion, someone said "what's the best way to get librarians out of the library?"

What, they bring their pillows and bed down for the night? Are they staging a sit-in? No, apparently directors worried that librarians who do most of their work in the library building might not be aware of what's going on in academic departments and that, in turn, faculty whose research needs are often answered by electronic resources might have little idea what librarians do for a living—or what we could be doing to help them.

Colorado and Kansas Libraries Collaborate To Reduce Cost of Out-of-State Borrowing

New courier system saves money compared to postal service and other carriers. It also affects lending patterns and may give a nudge toward collaborative collection development.

Full article:
http://www.libraryjournal.com/lj/home/889231-264/colorado_and_kansas_libraries_collaborate.h...

No Argument: Thomas Keeps 5-Year Silence

The anniversary will probably be observed in silence.

A week from Tuesday, when the Supreme Court returns from its midwinter break and hears arguments in two criminal cases, it will have been five years since Justice Clarence Thomas has spoken during a court argument.

Interesting article in the NYT about this.
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/13/us/13thomas.html?_r=1&scp=2&sq=thomas&st=cse

The Ethics of Free Cellphone Calls

When I last wrote about the quest to get free phone calls forever, a number of readers wrote to point out a very sneaky trick that lets you achieve that frugal heaven — even from your cellphone. Yes, it’s a way to get free cellphone calls, without listening to an ad, without being in Wi-Fi, without using any minutes.

Full article: Pogue's Post in the NYT

Oregon Attorney’s Documentary ‘Hot Coffee’ Makes the Sundance Cut

Many lawyers have fantasized about putting their practice on hold and making a movie, but few actually do it.

Even fewer can say their maiden effort landed them a coveted spot at an internationally renowned film festival.

Ashland, Ore., lawyer Susan Saladoff is that rare lawyer who not only followed her dreams but has bragging rights to boot. Her 2009 film Hot Coffee will be screened at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.

The feature-length documentary is one of 16 selected from 841 entrants for the festival's U.S. documentary competition. It largely focuses on the infamous 1994 McDonald's coffee spill case—in which a jury awarded plaintiff Stella Liebeck $2.86 million in damages after she spilled hot coffee on herself—while also exploring how and why the case has become so iconic.

Full article here.

Speck by Speck, Dust Piles Up

Article about dust. Man with a 31,000 volume library is mentioned.

Full article: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/10/garden/10dust.htm

Frederick Douglass

Saw a presentation by a reenactor of Frederick Douglass. The speaker recommended two books on Douglass.

Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln

The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics

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