Bibliofuture's blog

How to Think About the Great Ideas

In How to Think about The Great Ideas, Adler summarizes the most important ideas of Western thought, explicating their histories and developments as well as their importance in our lives today. He explains not only what the Great Ideas are, but why they are great. This volume is an excellent introduction to the key ideas of 2500 years of Western thought.

About the author: Mortimer J. Adler was an American philosopher who lived from 1902 to 2001. He was the author of over sixty books, one of them entitled How to Think about God, and the editor of hundreds of books. He was a major force in promoting the ""Great Books"" idea as an educational paradigm. He founded the Institute for Philosophical Research, launched the Paidea movement for educational reform, and revolutionized the Encyclopedia Britannica.

How to Think About the Great Ideas: From the Great Books of Western Civilization

Have a wooded lot? Time to build a forest book nook!

If you're in search of an inspiring live work home – a forest book nook – try these digs on for size! The Scholar’s Library in Olive Bridge, New York by local architecture firm Gluck & Partners is an unusual raised house plan surrounded by lush, leafy woods. This simple but striking space sits perched among the treetops, with a study space enclosed in windows at the top, and the actual library – housing approximately 10,000 books – tucked in the windowless area below.

See pictures here.

I only read real books

Kindle ad where one of the characters opens the ad with the line - "I only read real books"
In the comments to the ad there is the continuing debate of paper books vs. ebooks.

A Weekend’s Worth of Vintage Book Covers

Blog post at Publisher's Weekly XYZ blog about a site that shows vintage paperback covers. You can see the blog post here.

Good Book......Bad Font Choice!!

Bad font in book according to Amazon reviews. Book is: The Repurposed Library: 33 Craft Projects That Give Old Books New Life

Interesting use of data

Using data they bought from a maker of GPS navigators, Dutch police set up speed cameras where drivers were most likely to break the limit.

See full story on NPR

Bronze Girl With Book Stolen From Library?

A bronze statue of a girl reading has been stolen from outside the Revere Public Library.

http://www.thebostonchannel.com/r/27701718/detail.html

Wonder if this was stolen by someone that appreciated the statue or someone that just wants it for the scrap metal value?

$1100 trash cans part of library fixup?

Chairs aren't the only thing that cost $1100 apiece in a controversial renovation of a Detroit Public Library wing.

Full article: http://bit.ly/j2JhS4

Malcolm X's Daughter Disputes Claims in New Bio on Father

A controversial new biography about Malcolm X makes some provocative assertions about the late civil rights leader's sexuality and the circumstances surrounding his death. Earlier this month, host Michel Martin spoke to one of the lead researchers of the book. Today, Martin gets another perspective from Ilyasah Shabazz, Malcolm X's third daughter. They discuss her reflections on her father's life and the allegations in the new biography about him.

Listen to story at NPR

The Atlas of New Librarianship

The Atlas of New Librarianship shows a publication date of May 31, 2011 but the book seems to be shipping now.

Table of contents for the book.

Companion website to the book.

$20 Per Gallon

$20 Per Gallon: How the Inevitable Rise in the Price of Gasoline Will Change Our Lives for the Better

This book received a starred review at Publisher's Weekly.

Imagine an everyday world in which the price of gasoline (and oil) continues to go up, and up, and up. Think about the immediate impact that would have on our lives.

Of course, everybody already knows how about gasoline has affected our driving habits. People can't wait to junk their gas-guzzling SUVs for a new Prius. But there are more, not-so-obvious changes on the horizon that Chris Steiner tracks brilliantly in this provocative work. -- Read More

Mourning A Mentor: Students Pay Tribute To Marable

Columbia University professor Manning Marable did not live to see the publication of his life's work, a new biography called Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention. The book was released Monday, just days after Marable, 60, died Friday of complications from pneumonia.

Marable was the author of 15 books and a multitude of scholarly articles. He founded Colgate University's Africana and Latin American Studies program as well as the Institute for Research in African-American Studies at Columbia, where he was a mentor to countless students. Three of them gathered in the late scholar's office over the weekend to discuss why Marable was such an important influence on them — and on African-American research in the U.S.

Full piece on NPR

Netflix Nabs Rights to Stream 'Mad Men'

Netflix has inked a deal with Lionsgate TV for streaming rights to Mad Men reruns.

The video service paid nearly $1 million per episode for all seven seasons of the AMC drama, which will begin airing July 27.

Full story

Amazon underbidder on frontlist auction

Amazon underbidder on frontlist auction

Amazon has emerged as the surprise underbidder on a multi-million dollar auction for a self-published author, the first time the retailer is believed to have bid on frontlist.

Full article here.

Publishing consultant Mike Shatzkin comments on the article.

E-Reserves Lawsuit / Kindlefish

Judge Sets Trial Date in Georgia State University E-Reserves Lawsuit
http://bit.ly/hnKdZM

Kindlefish Turns Kindle Into Worldwide Translator
http://bit.ly/dHbOfG

Should physical & e-book sales be protected from the elusive danger of library e-book checkouts?

Radio story

When a library buys a book, it buys it once. This was the case for e-books as well. Now, HarperCollins is making its e-books expire for libraries after 26 checkouts. In other words, it’s treating an e-book like an e-subscription to a magazine, such that the library never actually owns the book outright. And libraries are outraged; some are even boycotting all HarperCollins books, which include those by Anne Rice, Sarah Palin, and Michael Crichton. Libraries claim that, as demand for e-books skyrockets, they cannot afford to re-buy e-books. HarperCollins, which is owned by Rupert Murdoch, claims that this move is necessary to protect e-book retail sales, physical book sales, and brick-and-mortar bookstores. Do you think that all publishers should take this move to protect book sales? Or do you side with libraries, which are already pinched for money as state budgets are slashed across the country? Would you like to see the price of e-books be kept from going too low or do you see e-books as a natural progression that should not be tampered with?

Download MP3 here

Webpage of story here.

Creating a digital public library without Google's money

Like other authors and researchers, I'm conflicted about the project. On the plus side, the vision of a widely accessible digital library is a worthy one that is, for the first time in human history, technologically achievable.

On the other hand, Google was plotting to acquire effective control over millions of works whose copyrights belong to others.

Full article in the LA Times

Noted Self-Publisher May Be Close to a Book Deal

Amanda Hocking, the darling of the self-publishing world, has been shopping a four-book series to major publishers, attracting bids of well over $1 million for world English rights, two publishing executives said.

Full post at NYT.com

"The Rise and Fall of the Bible": Rethinking the Good Book

Recently I found myself explaining to a group of surprised friends from Protestant and secular backgrounds that, despite being educated in the Catholic faith up to the sacrament of confirmation at age 14, I didn't read the Old Testament until I was assigned it in a college literature course. Traditionally, the Catholic Church did not encourage its congregation to read the Bible; we had the priests to explain it to us. In fact, the church once took such a dim view of the idea that, in 1536, the English reformer William Tyndale was tried for heresy, strangled and burned at the stake, largely for translating the Bible into English for a lay readership. Tyndale House, a major American Christian publisher, is named after him. -- Read More

Eisler’s decision is a key benchmark on the road to wherever it is we’re going

I wasn’t planning to write a post this past weekend for Monday morning publication. But then Joe Konrath and Barry Eisler contacted me on Saturday to tell me what Barry is up to. I’ve read their lengthy conversation about Barry’s decision to turn down a $500,000 contract (apparently for two books) and join Joe (and many others, but none who have turned down half-a-million bucks) as a self-published author.

To use a metaphor that connects with the current news: this is a very major earthquake. This one won’t cause a tsunami and a nuclear meltdown, but you better believe it will lead everybody living near a reactor — everybody working in a major publishing house — to do a whole new round of risk-assessment. Because, in its way, this is more threatening than the earthquake that just hit Japan. This self-publishing author will much more assuredly and directly spawn followers.

As news of Eisler’s decision spreads, phones will be ringing in literary agencies all over town with authors asking agents, “shouldn’t I be doing this?”

Full blog post

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