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Armed Services Editions

eBooks in Star Trek

The Drunken Botanist

Sake began with a grain of rice. Scotch emerged from barley, tequila from agave, rum from sugarcane, bourbon from corn. Thirsty yet? In The Drunken Botanist, Amy Stewart explores the dizzying array of herbs, flowers, trees, fruits, and fungi that humans have, through ingenuity, inspiration, and sheer desperation, contrived to transform into alcohol over the centuries.

Of all the extraordinary and obscure plants that have been fermented and distilled, a few are dangerous, some are downright bizarre, and one is as ancient as dinosaurs—but each represents a unique cultural contribution to our global drinking traditions and our history.

This fascinating concoction of biology, chemistry, history, etymology, and mixology—with more than fifty drink recipes and growing tips for gardeners—will make you the most popular guest at any cocktail party.

During December this book is $1.99 - The Drunken Botanist

Faithful and Virtuous Night: Poems


Faithful and Virtuous Night: Poems

Ready Player One

Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Laws for the Internet Age

Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Laws for the Internet Age

In sharply argued, fast-moving chapters, Cory Doctorow’s Information Doesn’t Want to Be Free takes on the state of copyright and creative success in the digital age. Can small artists still thrive in the Internet era? Can giant record labels avoid alienating their audiences? This is a book about the pitfalls and the opportunities that creative industries (and individuals) are confronting today — about how the old models have failed or found new footing, and about what might soon replace them. An essential read for anyone with a stake in the future of the arts, Information Doesn’t Want to Be Free offers a vivid guide to the ways creativity and the Internet interact today, and to what might be coming next.

See book here.

Railroad Empire across the Heartland

Railroad Empire across the Heartland: Rephotographing Alexander Gardner's Westward Journey

Best known for his Civil War photographs, Alexander Gardner also documented the construction of the Union Pacific Railway, Eastern Division (later the Kansas Pacific Railroad), across Kansas beginning in 1867. This book presents recent photographs by John R. Charlton of the scenes Gardner recorded, paired with the Gardner originals and accompanied by James E. Sherow's discussion. Like most rephotography projects, this one provides fascinating information about the changes in the landscape over the last century and a half.

The book presents ninety pairs of Gardner's and Charlton's photographs. In all of Charlton's photos he duplicates the exact location and time of day of the Gardner originals. Sherow uses the paired images to show how Indian and Anglo-American land-use practices affected the landscape. As the Union Pacific claimed, the railroad created an American empire in the region, and Charlton's rephotography captures the transformation of the grasslands, harnessed by the powerful social and economic forces of the railroad. -- Read More

One family’s quest to give Chinese orphans a happy home

After reaching their fifties and raising their own children, Jenny and Richard Bowen adopted 2-year-old Maya from China after learning of poor orphanage conditions for abandoned girls. Sixteen years later, the Bowens have two adopted daughters from the same region and have started a non-profit called Half the Sky to transform orphan care with the cooperation of the Chinese government.

Mark Twain: A Life

Mark Twain founded the American voice. His works are a living national treasury: taught, quoted, and reprinted more than those of any writer except Shakespeare. His awestruck contemporaries saw him as the representative figure of his times, and his influence has deeply flavoured the 20th and 21st centuries. Yet somehow, beneath the vast flowing river of literature that he left behind — books, sketches, speeches, not to mention the thousands of letters to his friends and his remarkable entries in private journals — the man who became Mark Twain, Samuel Langhorne Clemens, has receded from view.

It is hard to imagine a life that encompassed more of its times. Sam Clemens left his frontier boyhood in Missouri for a life on the Mississippi during the golden age of steamboats. He skirted the western theater of the Civil War before taking off for an uproariously drunken newspaper career in the Nevada of the Wild West. As his fame as a humorist and lecturer spread, witnessing the extremes of wealth and poverty of New York City and the Gilded Age (which he named). He travelled to Europe on the first American pleasure cruise and revitalized the prim genre of travel writing. He wooed and won his lifelong devoted wife, yet quietly pined for the girl who was his first crush and whom he would re-encounter many decades later. He invented and invested in get-rich-quick schemes. He became the toast of Europe and a celebrity who toured the globe. His comments on everything he saw, many published here for the first time, are priceless. -- Read More

Packard Bell - Library History

In 1996 Packard Bell put out a commercial that tried to show urban existence as negative with the point of the commercial being that using a Packard Bell computer "You can do it all from home". Librarians objected to the negative image of the library. The commercial has storm trooper like characters marching around the library shushing people. Packard Bell changed the commercial and lifted out the library scenes. The version here shows the library scene.

Amazon says it would be content with 30% of revenue if Hachette e-books were $9.99

Amazon says it would be content with 30% of revenue if Hachette e-books were $9.99
http://www.teleread.com/ebooks/amazon-would-be-content-with-30-margin-if-hachette-e-books-we...

Could Brooklyn hipsters help save the middle class?

Touring Buffalo's Urban Blight

The Writing's On the Wall

Six Degrees: The Science of a Connected Age

Six Degrees: The Science of a Connected Age

The pioneering young scientist whose work on the structure of small worlds has triggered an avalanche of interest in networks.

In this remarkable book, Duncan Watts, one of the principal architects of network theory, sets out to explain the innovative research that he and other scientists are spearheading to create a blueprint of our connected planet. Whether they bind computers, economies, or terrorist organizations, networks are everywhere in the real world, yet only recently have scientists attempted to explain their mysterious workings.

From epidemics of disease to outbreaks of market madness, from people searching for information to firms surviving crisis and change, from the structure of personal relationships to the technological and social choices of entire societies, Watts weaves together a network of discoveries across an array of disciplines to tell the story of an explosive new field of knowledge, the people who are building it, and his own peculiar path in forging this new science. -- Read More

Library memes



Preserving the LA story, one block at a time

The city of Los Angeles is constantly reinventing itself. But now, a project called "Survey L.A." is digging beneath the city's layers to identify, catalogue and preserve its diverse cultural history in electronic form. Jeffrey Brown reports on this effort to map the history of a relatively new and rapidly developing city.

May 8: Photos of the Day

Frustration in the White House press corps

Frustration is growing in the White House press corps due to limited access to the "transparency" president. In a piece that originally aired last year, Bob goes to the White House to find out how the role of the press corps is changing under this media savvy administration.

http://www.onthemedia.org/story/frustration-white-house-press-corps-3/

May 2: Photos of the Day

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