pv_sapl's blog

The Dunce Factor

Happens all too often now. Jump aboard the perverbial train, drive that train hard down the track to the end of the line and you'll discover the line end right at a point where was "supposed" to be a bridge. Indeed no bridge was found, and with little warning you are careening locomotive first into the canyon below.

'Every working Day' Logfile Review

Or events, if you use Microsoft Windows.

Lets see, tally up the server machines I've got here, were looking at four servers log files needed to review. Two minutes a log file in a lame attempt to discover if anything is amiss, and problably about 4 log files per machine to look over. That is a grand total of 32minutes a working day. Is that really enough?

Back to Debian

Well, I figured out why the debian box liked to crash and cause an out of memory error. Well, for one thing it likes to run more than 5 mysql processess @ 5~6megs resident in memory a piece. Then there is the apache service coupled with perl. 128Megs of memory is just not enough for a Testing release of a Debian LAMP (Linux-Apache-MySQL-Python-Perl-PHP) server.

Micro$oft's DNS Client on 2000/XP

Why am I not surprised? Well, it was definately not the proxy autoconfiguration script, or the caching proxy server itself. It all has to do with the rediculous DNS client Micro$oft silently runs as a service that is automagically started after installing either OS. This service is only useful for Active Directory, does absolutely nothing for that machine if your domain is not Active Directory.

Debian Linux for Request Tracker, Part Duex

I guess it is my own fault for wanting to run on the bleedin' edge. So I go back to the install floppies and successfully reinstall debian, only this time the dang thing decides not prompt me if I'd rather run a static IP address or one from DHCP. You'd think that debian installers would consider that this might be a server machine, but nooooooo. Running the install in Expert mode proved futile (where the installer actually prompts for this), but for whatever reason expert mode would not install any kernel the installer chose. So how did I get around this blasted anomoly? Yank out the network wire during the dhcp detection phase. Woohoo, I get the prompts for a static IP Address.

So, because I'm running unstable, instead of running head-long into piling on the packages after install, I meticulously pick and install each package one-by-one until I finally get down to request tracker. Slowly I add apache. Then Perl. Then apache-perl. then libapache-mod-perl. At least "apt-get" includes all the little bonus packages that are needed to run these apps. Can't get away from running OpenBSD's SSH protocol, gottah run putty off my XP desktop. Last but not least, Request Tracker. gunzip the doc install file for debian, setup the mysql user for the tables and run the debian install init script.

Strange, Request tracker doesn't want to run from apache-perl. Directory not found keeps poppin up in the browser. libhtml-mason-perl wanted the normal apache anyhoo, so lets try that. Bingo! Request Tracker login. Images ain't loading, but all I need is a symlink and it'll be fixed.

Now only if this headache between XP's built-in active-directory dns-client would quit complaining about my ISC Bind9 + Dynamic updat'ng DHCPD v3, my stupid computer would find more hosts. Could the bug exist in my auto-proxy configuration script? Why not just disable the dang service in Windows XP you ask? I would if I wasn't upgrading the local lan here to Windows Server 2003 and Active Directory...

Debian Linux

Waiting for my ??? install to complete. I don't remember how many times I've done this in the last two days. If I hadn't barfed the apache/perl install to get Request Tracker working here in the Library I wouldn't be wasting this much time. At least the proxy server I set up is caching some of the packages I've been downloading, downloading again, and again....

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