For Baseball Archivists, a Tag Ends Every Play


There are more than 500 possible tags to choose from, and among those chosen at that moment were “ground out,” “from knees,” “last out,” “premier plays,” “milestone call” and “hugging.”

Strangely, one tag not offered was “no-hitter.” Maybe soon.

This is how baseball’s archives are created now — not by merely storing videotapes on a shelf, as it has been done for decades, but by a team of “loggers” whose job is to watch every game as it happens (2,430 during the regular season, and up to 41 in the postseason) and add computerized notes on every play, no matter how ordinary.

“Your archive is only as good as what you know is in it,” said Elizabeth Scott, M.L.B. Productions’ vice president for programming and business affairs.

Full article in the NYT


I just died a little, inside.


It's a sensible way of indexing large amounts of data, what did you expect? A bank of eager didectic/savant baseball fans telling the presenters all the facts?

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