Filtering Out

Submitted by Blake on Wed, 01/26/2000 - 19:29
Topic

Greenvilleonline has a report on filtering moves in the libraries there.

\"The Greenville County Library Board on Monday rejected the use of filters in its efforts to deal with patrons viewing obscene materials and placed a greater responsibility on parents when their kids access the Internet on library computers. The board voted 8-0 to adopt a policy requiring parents to accompany children under age 12 when they access the Internet on computers in the countywide library system.
The new policy, which is expected to be reviewed by the county attorney\'s office in 10 days and put into effect two weeks afterwards, also requires parents to sign a statement that allows children between ages 12 and 17 to access the Internet without parental supervision. \"

The Weather Outside is Frightful

Submitted by Blake on Wed, 01/26/2000 - 19:09
Topic

From the Washington Post

With workers firing up home computers and fax machines, children Web surfing, and others using the day at home to make long calls, telecommunications systems throughout the region slowed down or didn\'t function at all.

Bell Atlantic reported heavy congestion yesterday as people used phone lines while they tried to work at home rather than risk a treacherous drive to the office.

Study on Online Education Sees Optimism, With Caution

Submitted by Blake on Wed, 01/26/2000 - 19:06

The NY Times has a report on online learning.

An online class, the report concluded, can be a worthy and in some cases a great educational experience. But to work effectively, online class sizes should be limited. And Internet learning may be inappropriate for certain academic endeavors, most notably, the completion of an entire undergraduate degree program.

Watch your cookies

Submitted by Blake on Wed, 01/26/2000 - 16:50
Topic

The USA Today Reports
DoubleClick Inc., the Internet\'s largest advertising company, has begun tracking Web users by name and address as they move from one Web site to the next, USATODAY.com has learned.

The practice, known as profiling, gives marketers the ability to know the household, and in many cases the precise identity, of the person visiting any one of the 11,500 sites that use DoubleClick\'s ad-tracking \"cookies.\"

What made such profiling possible was DoubleClick\'s purchase in June of Abacus Direct Corp., a direct-marketing services company that maintains a database of names, addresses, telephone numbers and retail purchasing habits of 90% of American households

Family Research Council joins library Internet filters fray

Submitted by Blake on Wed, 01/26/2000 - 14:01
Topic

Story from gr.mlive.com
HOLLAND, MI -- Another conservative powerhouse is entering the local debate on Internet filters.

The Family Research Council is considering to what extent it will become involved in a campaign for a Feb. 22 ballot initiative that would require the Herrick District Library to install Internet filters on computers to prevent children from gaining access to pornography.